Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Clim. Past, 12, 1009-1027, 2016
http://www.clim-past.net/12/1009/2016/
doi:10.5194/cp-12-1009-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
15 Apr 2016
The link between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle
Sabine Egerer1,2, Martin Claussen1,3, Christian Reick1, and Tanja Stanelle4 1Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstraße 53, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
2International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modelling, Bundesstraße 53, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
3Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability, Universität Hamburg, Bundesstraße 53, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
4Center for Climate System Modeling, ETH Zurich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
Abstract. Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 to 5.5 ka ago. The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. Here we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface. We simulate the mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere–aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. Mid-Holocene surface characteristics, including vegetation cover and lake surface area, are derived from proxy data and simulations. In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the increase in dust accumulation in marine cores is directly linked to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone.

Citation: Egerer, S., Claussen, M., Reick, C., and Stanelle, T.: The link between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle, Clim. Past, 12, 1009-1027, doi:10.5194/cp-12-1009-2016, 2016.
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We demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine sediment cores and Saharan land surface by simulating the mid-Holocene and pre-industrial dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6-HAM2.1. Mid-Holocene surface characteristics, including vegetation cover and lake surface area, are derived from proxy data and simulations.
We demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine sediment...
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