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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 5
Clim. Past, 12, 1151–1163, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-1151-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Climatic and biotic events of the Paleogene

Clim. Past, 12, 1151–1163, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-1151-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 13 May 2016

Research article | 13 May 2016

Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

Hemmo A. Abels et al.

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Short summary
Ancient greenhouse warming episodes are studied in river floodplain sediments in the western interior of the USA. Paleohydrological changes of four smaller warming episodes are revealed to be the opposite of those of the largest, most-studied event. Carbon cycle tracers are used to ascertain whether the largest event was a similar event but proportional to the smaller ones or whether this event was distinct in size as well as in carbon sourcing, a question the current work cannot answer.
Ancient greenhouse warming episodes are studied in river floodplain sediments in the western...
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