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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 4
Clim. Past, 12, 807–817, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-807-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Clim. Past, 12, 807–817, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-807-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 05 Apr 2016

Research article | 05 Apr 2016

Model simulations of early westward flow across the Tasman Gateway during the early Eocene

Willem P. Sijp1, Anna S. von der Heydt2, and Peter K. Bijl3 Willem P. Sijp et al.
  • 1ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
  • 2Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Centre for Extreme Matter and Emergent Phenomena, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • 3Marine Palynology and Paleoceanography, Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geoscience, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht, the Netherlands

Abstract. The timing and role in ocean circulation and climate of the opening of Southern Ocean gateways is as yet elusive. Recent micropalaeontological studies suggest the onset of westward throughflow of surface waters from the SW Pacific into the Australo-Antarctic Gulf through a southern shallow opening of the Tasman Gateway from 49–50 Ma onwards, a direction that is counter to the present-day eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Here, we present the first model results specific to the early-to-middle Eocene where, in agreement with the field evidence, southerly shallow opening of the Tasman Gateway indeed causes a westward flow across the Tasman Gateway. As a result, modelled estimates of dinoflagellate biogeography are in agreement with the recent findings. Crucially, in this situation where Australia is still situated far south and almost attached to Antarctica, the Drake Passage must be sufficiently restricted to allow the prevailing easterly wind pattern to set up this southerly restricted westward flow. In contrast, an open Drake Passage, up to 517 m deep, leads to an eastward flow, even when the Tasman Gateway and the Australo-Antarctic gulf are entirely contained within the latitudes of easterly wind.

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The timing and role in ocean circulation and climate of the opening of Southern Ocean gateways is as yet elusive. Here, we present the first model results specific to the early-to-middle Eocene where, in agreement with the field evidence, a southerly shallow opening of the Tasman Gateway does indeed cause a westward flow across the Tasman Gateway, in agreement with recent micropalaeontological studies.
The timing and role in ocean circulation and climate of the opening of Southern Ocean gateways...
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