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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 3
Clim. Past, 13, 267–301, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-267-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Clim. Past, 13, 267–301, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-267-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 29 Mar 2017

Research article | 29 Mar 2017

Was the Little Ice Age more or less El Niño-like than the Medieval Climate Anomaly? Evidence from hydrological and temperature proxy data

Lilo M. K. Henke et al.
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Mar 2016) by Nerilie Abram
AR by Lilo Henke on behalf of the Authors (14 Jul 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (29 Nov 2016) by Nerilie Abram
AR by Lilo Henke on behalf of the Authors (12 Feb 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 Mar 2017) by Nerilie Abram
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
To understand future ENSO behaviour we must look at the past, but temperature and rainfall proxies (e.g. tree rings, sediment cores) appear to show different responses. We tested this by making separate multi-proxy ENSO reconstructions for precipitation and temperature and found no evidence of a disagreement between ENSO-driven changes in precipitation and temperature. While this supports our physical understanding of ENSO, the lack of good proxy data must be addressed to further explore this.
To understand future ENSO behaviour we must look at the past, but temperature and rainfall...
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