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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 14, issue 11
Clim. Past, 14, 1819-1850, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1819-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Clim. Past, 14, 1819-1850, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1819-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 28 Nov 2018

Research article | 28 Nov 2018

Carbon burial in deep-sea sediment and implications for oceanic inventories of carbon and alkalinity over the last glacial cycle

Olivier Cartapanis et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Oct 2018) by Luke Skinner
AR by olivier cartapanis on behalf of the Authors (12 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (01 Nov 2018) by Luke Skinner
AR by olivier cartapanis on behalf of the Authors (02 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
A data-based reconstruction of carbon-bearing deep-sea sediment shows significant changes in the global burial rate over the last glacial cycle. We calculate the impact of these deep-sea changes, as well as hypothetical changes in continental shelf burial and volcanic outgassing. Our results imply that these geological fluxes had a significant impact on ocean chemistry and the global carbon isotopic ratio, and that the natural carbon cycle was not in steady state during the Holocene.
A data-based reconstruction of carbon-bearing deep-sea sediment shows significant changes in the...
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