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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 14, issue 6
Clim. Past, 14, 811-824, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-811-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Clim. Past, 14, 811-824, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-811-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 18 Jun 2018

Research article | 18 Jun 2018

Assessing the impact of large volcanic eruptions of the last millennium (850–1850 CE) on Australian rainfall regimes

Stephanie A. P. Blake et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (11 Dec 2017) by Stefan Bronnimann
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (01 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Mar 2018) by Stefan Bronnimann
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Mar 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Mar 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Apr 2018) by Stefan Bronnimann
AR by Stephanie Blake on behalf of the Authors (10 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 May 2018) by Stefan Bronnimann
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We studied the impact of the six largest tropical eruptions in reference to Australian precipitation, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), and El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Volcanic forcing increased the likelihood of El Niños and positive IODs (pIOD) and caused positive rainfall anomalies over north-west (NW) and south-east (SE) Australia. Larger sulfate loading caused more persistent pIOD and El Niños, enhanced precipitation over NW Australia, and dampened precipitation over SE Australia.
We studied the impact of the six largest tropical eruptions in reference to Australian...
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